Work Stuff

The Most Stressful Day of My Life …

… was yesterday.

I’ve had a lot of stressful days in my life, but yesterday, took the prize.

It all started, when my boss asked me if I wanted to work the Carthage clinic.

I immediately tensed up. I’ve been to three clinics since I began working this job: Branson twice and Harrison once.

And all of these times, I just sort of sat and watched what was happening. It’s not hard and I felt like I had the hang of it, but then …

… that was months ago. Then, they started cross-training another co-worker of mine to start working the outlining clinics. I tried not to take it personally but I just figured, Meh. I must not have caught on and ouch, but I would live.

I sort of forgot about outlying clinics, quite frankly.

So when my boss asked me on Wednesday if I wanted to work the Carthage clinic, by myself, with a doctor I’ve only spoken to TWICE, in a clinic I’ve never even been to, I naturally said yes.

OMG, what WAS I thinking?!?!?

So I began stressing about the ordeal. I asked a ton of questions and a co-worker gathered all of the necessary paperwork for me to take. I would be responsible for checking patients in, having them sign paperwork, taking their pictures and scanning their ID’s and insurance cards.

Easy-peasey, right?

It didn’t really occur to me, until about 4:00 on Thursday (because I was SLAMMED on Thursday and really didn’t have time to think about it, actually), that I didn’t know how to set the damn computers up.

Swell.

So by this time, most everyone I could ask was gone for the day and did I mention I was leaving to work the clinic the very next morning?!

I got up early Friday morning, got ready (it was sort of nice to wear business casual for a change and not scrubs), and went up to the clinic to hunt down the IT guy. Luckily, I found him right away and we went over how to set the computers up.

That helped. I was actually feeling a bit more confident about the day. I went to my desk to pack up my fan.

Yes. Fan. Because between my hot flashes and my nervous sweats, which only get worse after I start sweating and I know people can SEE that I’m sweating, I wanted to make sure I wasn’t a hot sweaty mess with a moist mustache checking patients in.

Not exactly professional attire, right?

Suddenly, I heard my name being paged overhead. The doctor and his PA were ready. Did I mention I had to drive the company van, a van I’ve been in twice and have NEVER driven, to the hospital to pick up the doctor and his PA after their morning rounds?

Just add THAT to my heaping helping of stress and well … I WAS A WRECK BEFORE WE EVEN LEFT THE BUILDING.

I panicked. OMG! I can’t make the doctor wait on me!!!! is what I thought and I grabbed my stuff, loaded up the two cases of laptops and cords and away we went. The van wasn’t that hard to drive and we made it to the hospital (which is only down the street from our clinic) in pretty good time. I pulled up under the awning and there was the doctor and his PA, waiting on us.

I hurriedly got out of the van (because there was NO WAY on God’s green earth I was going to drive the doctor all the way to Carthage) and got into the back seat.

I began to relax.

Okay. So far, so good.

About five minutes into the journey, when we had just driven onto the highway, did a thought suddenly occur to me.

DID I pack the case with all of my paperwork?????

The nurse was sitting in the back of the van and I turned around, “Hey [insert name of nurse here], do you see a black suitcase with silver trim back there?”

She looked. “No,” she said.

I immediately panicked. I ripped off my seatbelt and crawled (rather unceremoniously, I might add. The PA, who was driving, probably caught a very good view of my ass as I scrambled over the seats) to look for myself.

SWEET JESUS – I FORGOT TO PACK THE PAPERWORK.

I’m not even sure how to describe what I was feeling. I was horrified beyond belief. I have NEVER felt that horrified in my entire life. My chest started hurting and I honest-to-God thought I was having a heart attack.

The nurse, who is super calm (which is a good attribute to have if you’re a nurse), called the nurse’s secretary to ask her to fax all of the paperwork to the clinic. Though I appreciated her jumping in and trying to solve MY problem, I couldn’t let her do all of the work.

I called my office manager. She didn’t pick up her phone, so I left a message.

“Hey [insert office manager name here], I’m an idiot.” (The MA next to me laughed and said, “You’re not an idiot.” I just gave her a look as if to say, “Yeah right.”). I forgot to grab the case with the paperwork in it. Call me back on my cell …” Then I gave her my number.

“Should we go back?” I asked, hoping they would say yes.

The doctor, who had been silent up to this point and must just think I’m the stupidest person on Earth, said in a very calm voice, “Nah. We’ll be fine.”

That somehow made it worse because it made it sound like he had faith in me … OH MY DEAR GOD IN HEAVEN. Don’t think that! Is what I’m thinking to myself.

I’m not sure how I did it, but I outwardly remained calm. I called the clinic back and had my office manager paged. When I explained the situation, she sounded annoyed, but all business. She would make sure she faxed all of the paperwork to the clinic and would alert the clinic manager as to what was happening.

I felt like we should have slapped a sign on the van, “IDIOT ABOARD.”

OH MY DEAR GOD IN HEAVEN.

I’m pretty sure I started hyperventilating. That was going to be a lot of paperwork – we had 15 patients scheduled that day.

Now I know what people are talking about when they describe panic attacks – they feel like heart attacks, they say. And now? I completely agree. In fact, I’m getting anxious just typing this story out. My heart was thumping so hard I’m pretty sure the MA next to me heard it. She sort of awkwardly patted me on the thigh and quietly said under her breath, “It’ll be okay, it’s not the end of the world. Breathe.”

It took an hour to get to the clinic. And I think my heart finally slowed it’s pace about fifty-five minutes later. By the time we entered the building, I had gotten over my initial horror/shock and I was resigned to the fact that I’m an idiot and I might as well make the best of a terrible situation.

The clinic manager was SUPER NICE. Like CAUTIOUSLY NICE, as if she was treating a person made of glass and indeed, I FELT like I was about to shatter into a million pieces at that point. She took me to the area that we usually use and instructed me where things were. She gave me a STACK (it was about fifty pages) of paperwork to sort through. I set up my computer, plugged everything in, opened up my programs (just like the IT guy and I had practiced that morning), and began sorting through an impossibly messy and disorganized pile of paperwork – in the meantime, the first three patients, who had already arrived, stared at me waiting to be helped.

I took a calming breath, always conscience that the doctor was just doors away and though he was busy setting up his own stuff, would be ready to see patients at any moment and I was the one responsible to get the ball rolling, and just dove right into the middle of it.

Somehow, I managed to survive the first thirty minutes. Things finally started to settle down and I actually had a few minutes to straighten things up and put things into some sort of organized chaos.

Once we got going, I think I did okay. The MA always had at least one or two patients to show back to their rooms and the day rolled by relatively smoothly. I’m pretty sure I missed some things and I completely forgot to take one patient’s picture (he was one of the first and quite honestly, I’m surprised I was able to string a complete sentence together I was so stressed, let alone remembering to take his picture), but I’ll just have to clean up my mistakes this week.

Somehow, by the grace of God, I made it through the clinic without completely losing my sh*t. The last patient finally left and we packed up our gear and piled back into the van. We all ate lunch at a nearby Mexican restaurant and the doctor bought our lunch, (did I mention he is SUPER NICE?!?) It was probably one of the more awkward meals of my life, but not THE most awkward (I’ve had a lot of awkward meals in my life too, like eating with Kevin’s bosses over the years) and I felt a little better after we ate. Not because of the food but because THANK GOD, it was over and we were heading back to the clinic.

The PA drove us back to the hospital so he and the doctor could get out and I guess the nurse no longer trusted me (can’t say that I blame her) and she drove us back to our clinic.

I pretty much collapsed back into my chair, in my cubicle, after we arrived.

I apologized all over myself and quite a few ladies gave me a hard time, but I didn’t care, I had survived and it wasn’t as bad as it COULD have been and did I mention I was just thankful that it was OVER???

So. Now? Who knows if they will trust me to ever work an outlying clinic again. The wanting-to-be-super-employee part of me hopes they haven’t lost all confidence in me and will ask me again, but MOST of me hopes they never bring up the subject again.

I think mostly? I’m disappointed in myself because honestly? That was a pretty STUPID thing for me to do.

_______________________________________

By the way, it has started: The whole “let’s get together after work” thing. I can’t fall into this trap. Because when you start hanging out with co-workers after work, things suddenly … get messy. I used the “I already have plans” card to get out of going to see a movie with the girls. But if/when they get to know me better, they will realize that I NEVER have anything to do on the weekends and …

… I’d like to keep it that way.

And … by the way, er, way … one of my co-worker’s job is in jeopardy. The sh*t will likely hit the fan on Monday. I don’t know if she’ll be fired, but it’s going to get ugly. Would you think less of me if the first thing I thought of was … HEY! Maybe I’ll be able to nab a better shift if she leaves!

I’m so bad.

Saturday Photo Hunt

Saturday Photo Hunt: Flash

IMAG1467.jpg

Granted, not the best picture of us, but it was taken with Kevin’s phone, at night, and the flash gave us a yellow-ish tinge, and my boobs are nearly down to my belly, but every time I see this picture, it makes me smile, because we were in Chicago, riding the night trolley to see the lights and just enjoying each other’s company.

That’s picture perfect in my book. 🙂

See more Saturday Photo Hunt pictures here.

Work Stuff

My First Solo Clinic – God Help Me

On Wednesday, my boss asked me if I would work the Carthage clinic this coming Friday – as in today.

I quickly learned I would be working it by myself.

With a doctor I’ve never worked with before.

And did I mention I’ve never even BEEN to this clinic before?? I have no idea how it’s set up or what to expect.

To say I was stressed yesterday would be an understatement. In fact, I worked myself up so much that my heart actually hurt by the end of the day.

I will be wearing business casual attire, not scrubs. And I’m quite certain I will be drenched in nervous sweat before the day is out. So I’m totally taking my fan and I don’t care if the team thinks I’m weird. I know, between my hot flashes and the fact that I profusely sweat when I’m nervous, I’ll need it.

Appearances be damned.

I’m going to get to the clinic early so the IT guy can show me how to set up the laptops for the team to use. Then I will drive the company van to the hospital to pick up the doctor, the PA and the nurse. The PA will then take over the driving part (THANK GOD) and we’ll drive an hour and a half to the clinic where I will frantically set things up (and pray to God it all comes together smoothly and actually works), and then check patients in, complete with scanning their ID’s and insurance cards and taking their pictures, to checking them out when they’ve been seen.

And this is assuming I’m not throwing up from the car trip. (Did I mention I get car sick? As in DEATHLY sick?? Note to self: don’t forget the Dramamine).

There are 15 patients on the schedule for tomorrow.

That’s about half the number of patients our doctors see on a daily basis. (Full clinics run about 30 patients per doctor).

I’m trying hard not to get too stressed about this because I will make myself sick if I do. I’m going to just take a deep breath and do my best, that’s all I can do.

I’ll let you all know how it goes – assuming my head doesn’t explode in the interim.

Politics

The Upside to Chief Justice Roberts’ Ruling on Obamacare Today

Whoa Nelly.

There’s been a lot of anger stirred up by Chief Justice Roberts’ deciding vote on Obamacare today.

But before you get too worked up, consider this perspective from I.M. Citizen:

Chief Justice Roberts actually ruled the mandate, relative to the commerce clause, was unconstitutional. That’s how the Democrats got Obama-care going in the first place. This is critical. His ruling means Congress can’t compel American citizens to purchase anything. Ever. The notion is now officially and forever, unconstitutional. As it should be.

Next …

Roberts gave them a tax. It is now the official law of the land — beyond word-play and silly shenanigans. Obama-care is funded by tax dollars. Democrats now must defend a tax increase to justify the Obama-care law.

Finally …

Chief Justice Roberts struck down as unconstitutional, the Obama-care idea that the federal government can bully states into complying by yanking their existing medicaid funding. Liberals, through Obama-care, basically said to the states — ‘comply with Obama-care or we will stop existing funding.’ Roberts ruled that is a no-no. If a state takes the money, fine, the Feds can tell the state how to run a program, but if the state refuses money, the federal government can’t penalize the state by yanking other funding. Therefore, a state can decline to participate in Obama-care without penalty. This is obviously a serious problem. Are we going to have 10, 12, 25 states not participating in “national” health-care? Suddenly, it’s not national, is it?

Ultimately, Roberts supported states rights by limiting the federal government’s coercive abilities. He ruled that the government can not force the people to purchase products or services under the commerce clause and he forced liberals to have to come clean and admit that Obama-care is funded by tax increases.

Another benefit of this ruling?

Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign said on Thursday it had raised $3.2 million following the Supreme Court’s decision upholding President Barack Obama’s health care law.

Go ahead, Mr. President – gloat. Enjoy your remaining time in office because November? Is fast approaching …

Politics

If the Government Deems You Obese, They Will Force You to Go to Counseling

“”The AP reported Monday that ALL obese adults receive “intensive counseling” in an effort to rein in a growing health crisis in America. This “Preventative Services Task Force”, TASK FORCE, urging doctors to identify patients, name names, who have a body mass index, or BMI, of 30 or more, which is considered obese in this country. Doctors are either to provide intense counseling themselves, because doctors have a lot of free time on their hands, or refer the patient to a program which is designed to improve weight loss and health prospects.’ Isn’t this wonderful? This is precisely the thing that the Left said wouldn’t happen. Anyone who claimed that it would was just trying to scare you, where your doctor would have to report you to the government if you fell under the government’s category of obese so that you would go under government-required intense therapy. But hey! IT’S FREE!! HEALTHCARE IS FREE!! IT’LL MAKE IT AFFORDABLE AND FREE!! Oh, the strings attached. And this is what happens when it’s “free” to you. The person who controls the purse strings controls YOU.”

Is it worth it? Is it? When you give someone, or some entity, like the government, control over some aspect of your life, you no longer have any authority to make your own decisions. You are at the mercy of that person, or entity.

NOTHING IS FREE, FOLKS. Everything has a price. And Obamacare? Will cost you your freedom to make your own decisions when it comes to your own body. I’m not willing to pay that price.

I pray every night that this piece of sh*t legislature gets overturned. And I pray nightly that we get rid of this power-hungry dictator in November. Give me back my freedoms!

Yo.


(Click the blue arrow to play)
(Starting at 5:55)

Articles:

Let fat Americans pack it on — but make them pay for it, too

Federal task force wants obese Americans placed into counseling

Obesity Screening: Doctors Urged To Routinely Check Patients’ BMIs
Huffington Post kills me – doctors won’t be URGED to check patient’s BMI’s, they will be REQUIRED to check BMI’s and REPORT obese people, and that’s obese by the government’s standards, so that they, the obese people, can be ORDERED to go to counseling. There’s no urging, folks. That makes it sound like it’s a choice, that it’s a good deed on the doctor’s part. No. The choice was taken away the MOMENT this stupid, asinine law was passed. I hope you’re happy, Liberals, because this is the beginning of the end of personal freedoms and choice.

Abundant Life

Audio Teaching: Commit Yourself To God

by Dan Gallagher
It has never been really too difficult to put a teaching together from the Bible that confronts a variety of sinful actions and attitudes. In this teaching, rather than confront sin, Dan Gallagher goes directly to the root of the sin problem and examines what it means to “commit our way to the Lord” (Psalm 37:4). Dan demonstrates that being committed to God is, in the Hebraic mindset, being “rolled up” with the Father, which is well illustrated by the way that the red and white parts of the candy cane are twisted together to become one. We become committed to God when our words and actions demonstrate obedience to Him. We must be honest about our sin, calling it truthfully what it is, then confessing it, repenting of it, and once again moving forward.In this teaching you will also see how increasing in our commitment to God happens when we obey the leadings of the gift of holy spirit in each of us as it nudges us to do His will. We believe you will enjoy the fresh perspectives that this teaching gives as you learn to “roll yourself up in God.”

Click the arrow to listen.

Check out Truth or Tradition teachings on:

Facebook
Twitter
MySpace
YouTube
iTunes
Amazon
iPhone

Just Write

Just Write {1}

I walked into work today and the place was dark.

It was also quiet, but not in the way you might think. People were laughing and freely talking as opposed to the sound of fingers typing on a keyboard, or footsteps in the hallway, or clothing rustling as patients passed by us and were shown back to their rooms.

The time clock was dark – I couldn’t clock in to work this morning. Which was actually a blessing considering I was nearly ten minutes late.

The emergency lights were on and under the carefree conversation it was quiet – like the quiet that happens whenever electronics have been turned off. It was more than an audible quiet, it was more of a tangible quiet.

I walked toward my cubicle, but there was a small crowd surrounding it. I put my stuff down and laughed, “this reminds me of my house,” I said.

“Oh? Did you lose electricity at your house, too?” Our IT guy asked me.

“Nope. But it’s dark, like my house. We’ve been keeping all of our curtains drawn and our lights turned off in order to try and keep our house cool.”

The clinic had been without electricity for nearly 20 minutes before I arrived. And yet, we had a waiting room full of patients. The doctors were on site, but couldn’t do much without the patient’s electronic charts or the lights that house various xrays and other tests to be examined and explained.

I sat down and waited. There was nothing more I could do. I listened to various conversations around me, (there were several smaller groups of women clustered close by) and I would occasionally smile at a familiar face, or offer a polite chuckle or even offer my own two cents worth, depending on the topic.

The air was still and quite close. It began to grow hot and I grabbed a folder to fan myself.

I was hot.

I was always hot.

Though a power-less clinic with no air conditioning on a 95-degree day certainly didn’t help.

Ten minutes later, the lights came back on. Everyone started clapping, myself included.

I laughed. WHY do people clap when the lights come back on? I’m sure there are many psychological reasons.

Patients got up from their chairs, (most of them sat in chairs next to windows for light), and made their way up to the front desk to check in. It never ceases to amaze me how positive people are when they come to see us. First, they are in pain. Second, they had to know that their appointments with the doctors were going to be delayed because of the power outage and yet, 99% of them smiled and were pleasant.

I turned on my computer and began to work. The morning’s excitement died down and I found my groove – I began to pick up the pace and before long, my surroundings blurred around me, the sounds faded into the background and I was focused. I had just cleared a veteran to have his x-ray when *POP*, the power went off again.

We all sat motionless for several surprised seconds before someone broke the trance and moaned in annoyance.

The lights didn’t stay off as long the second time around and the novelty had worn off – we just wanted to get on with our day. There was some talk about canceling the clinic that day, but luckily, the lights came on shortly after the suggestion was made and we once again resumed our routine.

It’s amazing how helpless we feel whenever we lose power. It’s amazing just how much we take power for granted.

_________________________________